Saksham Kids School - Noida

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.”  – Winston Churchill

 

Soni Gupta, Bachelor of Social Work, working in a professional position in a reputed Real Estate Company says, for past thirteen years she has been associated with Saksham as a student and also as a teacher. Recalling, she says that she had quit studies as a result of poor financial conditions of her parents. Luckily, the school principal, Nadira Razak, a retired central government official, convinced her parents to let her come to school with the promise to pay for all her expenses. Her interest in studies and hard work has paid back that the daughter of daily wage laborers is now earning a respectable salary. Currently, EduCare is funding multiple programs at Saksham including annual salary of two teachers in the spirit of Malala Yousafzai’s UN speech about the struggle for literacy, “One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world”. In the coming years, EduCare will be soliciting exclusive sponsors for this NGO. Shaksham’s webpage is www.sakshamkids.org.

 

Have you ever pondered over the fact that there are children who are really capable of achieving great heights, but life fails them most of the time by snatching from them the very right of education. Saksham provides a platform to fulfill the dreams of these able kids. Saksham Vidyalaya (School), located in Nithari village of Noida, a suburb of capital of India, Delhi, is operated by a non-profit, non-religious, charitable trust (NGO). The NGO is operating an informal school in two shifts with enrolment of about 350 children who have been organized into classes, based on their level of learning. The classes are held for four hours per day for six days per week. The timings have been chosen to enable those who have been streamlined into regular school to attend the regular classes as well. The sole objective of the school is to bring minimum literacy to those children of this slum community who have missed the opportunity of going to school, and to provide extra coaching to intelligent poor children to excel. Recently, many of their students have excelled in “board” examinations and are studying in institutions of higher learning.

 

This informal school is not one where a specific group of students begin their academic year, continue together and finish it together. Nithari is a place of migrants and parents of these children do not have the privilege of a regular permanent job or source of income. And this uncertainty finds resonance in all the areas of their life, including what they wear, what and how much they eat, how much of medical help  they need , from where they can be able to afford it and what ailments they have to ignore. Understandably therefore, schooling of their children hurtles along in pace with the impediments of their economic conditions or even comes to a halt.

 

The results of the Senior Secondary and Secondary exams of the Uttar Pradesh Board have recently been declared. Many of the children who had been streamlined to Government schools and had been continuing with evening classes at Saksham have done well. Even in the case of those who haven’t scored exceptionally well, the fact that they have been able to reach this levels in itself is an achievement, because we are privy to the fact that many, many of the children who started out at Saksham have been compelled to give up their studies for umpteen reasons beyond their control.

 

Thirteen children have appeared for the entrance exam for admission to the Naodaya Vidyalayas, and the results are expected to be out soon. The list of such successful children goes on.

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